In episode 415, Mike and James continue with an overview of the evidence around depression. In this episode we talk about the use of antipsychotics for depression or augmentation of antidepressants, stopping antidepressants and the chances of withdrawal, and non-medication treatments.

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In episode 414, Mike and James continue with an overview of the evidence around depression. In this episode we talk about antidepressant management nuances from lower doses, to dose escalation, switching, and the time to response.

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Handout

In episode 413, Mike and James continue with an overview of the evidence around depression. In this episode we talk about the evidence around the effectiveness of antidepressants and learn if they work, how well they work, and if any one is better than the others.

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Handout

In episode 412, Mike and James do an overview of the evidence around depression. In this episode we talk about ruling out depression and the struggle of how to look at antidepressant evidence.

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Handout

In episode 411, Mike and James get annoyed – obviously in a nice way - having to talk about a new cohort study on eggs and an RCT of yet another omega-3 product. We try to put them into the context of all the other evidence available for these “products”.

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In episode 410, Mike, James, and Adrienne discuss the evidence around antidepressants in the elderly. We find 40% to 80% of elderly patients will recover with antidepressants, but a number of studies show no difference from placebo response rates. In addition, approximately 20% will stop due to adverse effects. 

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Tools for Practice

In episode 409, Mike and James yet again welcome Adrienne from Red Deer to talk about whether or not we need to give antibiotics for drained abscesses. We find out that relatively, the benefit of increased cure is similar to the chance of side effects.

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Tools for Practice

In episode 408, Mike and James talk about a couple of recent survey publications. One, which examined patient satisfaction around patient requests and denials of those requests. The other examined how often and why patients are not always honest about disclosing medically relevant information. At the end we decide there is a little liar in all of us and we just need to accept it.